What's New?

 
  • 04 Dec 2012 5:11 PM | Nancy Toombs (Administrator)


    EDA’s New "Marketing and Branding Your Community" course was held December 2,  2012 at the Two-Hills municipal office.  And participants gave it an enthusiastic thumbs-up! This is what they had to say:

    "This course was very timely and long overdue for our community. A great tool for building on."

    "The instructor, Natalie Gibson was excellent! There are some unique differences between each of our municipalities, but a lot is also the same. Working together, regionalization, and collaboration across the country is the answer."

    Among the 18 participating were elected officials, economic development practitioners, and Community Futures representatives. They came from places like:  Vegreville, County of Two-Hills, County of St. Paul, Willingdon, Myram, County of Vermillion.


  • 02 Dec 2012 6:53 PM | Nancy Toombs (Administrator)

    Thank you members for taking the time to complete our annual member survey.

    We want to know what we are doing right, and what areas you think we need to improve upon to best serve your needs.

    We are still analyzing the results, so far we are thrilled to tell you that nearly every EDA member said "yes" to recommending EDA to a friend or colleague!  


  • 09 Nov 2012 9:42 AM | Leann Hackman-Carty (Administrator)

    Today EDAC’s Board of Directors announced that they, in conjunction with Deloitte, RBC Financial Group and National Post have once again joined forces to offer Scholarships to their members.

    In 2012, they provided up to 12 $500 Scholarships (to be used in 2013) to EDAC members for their accredited courses/seminars.

    Online applications can be found here. Deadline to apply is December 31, 2012 so apply today. Applications will be reviewed in January and awarded by mid-February 2013.

  • 07 Nov 2012 12:57 PM | Leann Hackman-Carty (Administrator)

    November 7, 2012
    New Delhi, India

    Prime Minister Stephen Harper delivered the following remarks at the World Economic Forum:

    “Thank you very much.

    “Good morning.

    “Distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen, before I begin, I should just like to extend a few greetings, first of all to the Canadian business delegation, I want to thank all of you for making time in your busy schedules to support our Government’s trade and investment mission to India.

    “It is much appreciated.

    “Also to members of our Government caucus, Ministers Ed Fast, Tim Uppal and Bal Gosal, Senators Asha Seth and Tobias Enverga, Members of Parliament, Deepak Obhrai, Nina Grewal, Devinder Shory, Parm Gill and Kyle Seeback.

    “Thank you for coming, and also good to see my old friend and colleague Stockwell Day, here as well, great to see Stock again.

    “Finally, I’m sorry to learn that Professor Schwab cannot be with us today.

    “However, I’m pleased to once more meet with the World Economic Forum’s Managing Director Borge Brende.

    “And Borge, I look forward to our discussion in a few minutes.

    “Laureen and I visited India in 2009, and I have to tell you ladies and gentlemen, it left quite an impression.

    “The first thing you realize is that one trip cannot possibly be enough to even scrape the surface of this large and fascinating civilization.

    “So, it really is a pleasure to be back.

    “It is also a pleasure to be back at the World Economic Forum, a place where a great many people who want to make a difference regularly come to meet.

    “And I am delighted to see that you have also chosen to be in India, a place where globally important decisions are increasingly being made.

    “Almost a year ago, during your last Davos gathering, I highlighted some of Canada’s economic strengths and challenges.

    “On the former, on the strongest, Canadian banks remain the soundest in the world.

    “The World Economic Forum is one of several organizations that says so.

    “Canada’s net debt-to-GDP ratio remains the lowest in the G-7, and the lowest by far.

    “Thus Canada’s top credit rating has been reaffirmed by all of the major rating agencies.

    “Among G-7 countries, Canada now has the lowest overall tax rate on new business investment.

    “Canada also possesses a diverse yet harmonious society, with public institutions and a public service noted for professionalism and integrity.

    “All of these assets, as Borge mentioned, and others have helped Canada better weather and better recover from the global recession.

    “Indeed, despite the uncertainty of the times, the Canadian economy has now added more than eight hundred thousand net new jobs since July 2009.

    “Still, we remain acutely aware of the difficult global trends, especially for many developed countries.

    “As I said to the World Economic Forum in January, many countries with which Canada is traditionally aligned continue to be weighed down by debts they cannot seem to control, by entitlements they can no longer afford and by growth which threatens to remain sluggish for the foreseeable future.

    “As I said in January, it is high time we realize that:

    “The wealth of western economies is no more inevitable than the poverty of emerging ones.”

    “As these last four years have revealed, the wealth we enjoy today in the West is not inevitable. 

    “Our standard of living will be based on – and will be based only on – strong, growth-orientated policies and on getting the hard choices right.

    “That is why, over the past year, the Government of Canada has committed itself to a series of determined actions, we want to help ensure that growth, job creation and economic prosperity will be there for Canadians over the long term.

    “Now, broadly, for the sake of a shorthand, we categorize our various set of actions, which I’ll review quickly, into what I call the five ‘T’s’.

    “The first of these is taxes; what I mean by that is keeping them down while ensuring strong government finances at the same time.

    “We have continued to restrain and reform government expenditures to ensure that our budget will be balanced over the medium term and, perhaps more importantly, we have taken actions to ensure that the federal fiscal position will be clearly sustainable over the next generation and beyond.

    “The second ‘T’ is training and by that I mean that we are reforming broadly our labour markets.

    “We are investing in training and higher education at home.

    “We are also making Canada’s open and generous immigration system faster and more flexible in order to attract and integrate those with the skills we need as quickly as possible.

    “As well, we have improved incentives in our Employment Insurance program to better connect Canadians with available work.

    “The third ‘T’ refers to technology.

    “We are just beginning to comprehensively modernize our approach to research and innovation policy in order to get better commercial results for the significant government investments we make in scientific and technological development.

    “The fourth ‘T’ refers to the transformation, and specifically to the transformation of bureaucratic processes.

    “We are doing a number of things, for example, we have launched the Red Tape Reduction Initiative and the Responsible Resource Development Initiative.

    “The goal of the latter is to ensure that environmental reviews are comprehensive and that they are also completed in a reasonable timeframe according to the principle of ‘one project, one review’.

    “The final ‘T’ and the one that brings me again to this part of the world is, of course, trade, and more broadly, our Global Commerce Strategy for trade and investment.

    “Now since our Government came to office in 2006, we have successfully concluded foreign investment promotion and protection agreements with fourteen countries, that, of course, includes China.

    “We are negotiating with twelve more.

    “Since 2006, Canada has also concluded new trade agreements with nine countries and we’ve launched negotiations with over sixty others. 

    “These include the Trans-Pacific Partnership which we officially joined just one month ago.

    “They also include our current talks with the European Union, this is Canada’s most significant trade initiative since the signing of NAFTA and it is progressing very rapidly.

    “All of this leads me to talk about India.

    “During my 2009 visit and while Prime Minister Singh was with us in Canada the following year, I spoke about the need for Canada and India to become closer partners.

    “And while I believe that this clearly is a mutual objective,

    “I also believe we need to become closer partners more quickly.

    “When so much mutual interest, obvious synergy and cultural compatibility draw us together, greater momentum for a much closer and deeper partnership between Canada and India should be attainable.

    “Prime Minister Singh and I have agreed on a goal of expanding bilateral trade to fifteen billion dollars by 2015.

    “Certainly, Canada has demonstrated our commitment to this goal.

    “Canada now has seven Consulates throughout India.

    “We have strengthened high-level contact.

    “In addition to my trips, there have been no less than twenty-two visits from Canadian ministers since 2006.

    “Our businesses are also increasingly engaged.

    “Over 500 Canadian companies are here now, and hundreds more are making plans.

    “The Canada-India CEO Forum has been established.

    “And, I would be remiss not to mention the remarkable international partnership of Canada and India at the summits of the G-20 since their inception.

    “In fact, Canada and India have co-chaired and led consensus on two of the most important G-20 working groups:

    “On international financial sector reform, and on the framework for strong, sustainable and balanced global growth.

    “Ladies and gentlemen, through actions such as these, our priority on, and our commitment to, building bridges with India should be unmistakable.

    “And it all rests on a solid foundation.

    “We are inheritors of similar traditions and values.

    “We are pluralistic societies, seeking strength from our diversity.

    “We practice and esteem both the democracy and solidarity of our society and the rights and dignity of the individual.

    “Such bonds as these should allow not just for a profitable relationship, but for a profound friendship.

    “Certainly they have made it easy for India’s sons and daughters to integrate into Canadian life just as Canada’s efficient and predictable business climate has made it possible for so many of them to build businesses and achieve success in Canada.

    “In doing so, Indo-Canadians contribute tremendously to our country.

    “More than a million Canadians of Indian origin now live in Canada, more than three per cent of our entire population.

    “They work hard, give back to their communities and make us proud.

    “And you send us your young people in growing numbers.

    “Last year, more than twenty-three thousand Indian students studied or conducted research in Canada, that is a one-third increase in just one year, two-and-a-half times more in just the past three years.

    “I personally place great importance on these people-to-people links.

    “They are, and will be, a living bridge between our two great countries, a bridge of increasing span, and growing importance.

    “In fact, I am delighted to point out that there are no less than eight members of the government caucus in Canada, including two ministers, who trace their roots to India.

    “But besides these impressive human relationships, we are, as I said three years ago, also obvious partners.

    “This potential partnership is particularly obvious in the areas we have identified as core Canadian economic opportunities in India: energy, agriculture, infrastructure and education.

    “Canada, on the one hand, is a natural-resources powerhouse.

    “On the other, India needs resources to serve its growing industrial and technological strength.

    “Canada has strong, established public institutions.

    “India’s needs in areas like education and infrastructure are outstripping its capacity.

    “Canada is an outward-looking nation.

    “India’s reforms are increasingly opening its economy.

    “Canada understands that traditional economic linkages will not be sufficient to preserve our prosperity in this uncertain global economy.

    “And I think India likewise understands that while its aspirations are achievable, without the right policies, and the right partners, a continuation of its high rates of economic growth is simply not assured.

    “As I’ve said before, the untapped economic potential between us is massive and undeniable.

    “But, massive and undeniable as that potential is, it will not develop itself.


    “It will take concerted efforts by both of our countries to reap all of the benefits that this relationship can yield.

    “I acknowledge, ladies and gentlemen, that there has been progress.

    “The Social Security Agreement is finally done.

    “So too, at last, is the Administrative Arrangement to complete our Nuclear Cooperation Agreement.

    “Our Foreign Investment negotiations have come much of the way. 

    “We have to get serious about getting them over the finish line.

    “And negotiators will meet next week in Ottawa for the next round of discussions on a comprehensive economic partnership and trade agreement.

    “To complete that would ensure the realization of our ambitious trade goals and more, but we still do have a long way to go.

    “Friends, here’s the bottom line.

    “The world’s economy is moving quickly; Canada and India must also.

    “On our side, we have been deepening trade and investment ties with the largest, most dynamic markets in the world, the United States of course, the European Union, Japan, China.

    “We want India to be firmly in that list.

    “But time and tide wait for no one.

    “We must redouble our efforts.

    “Let us not lose the chance for both of our countries that this moment offers.

    “Now ladies and gentlemen, let me finish with this thought: you know, I believe there is a kind of parallel to Canada and India and the typical Bollywood plot.

    “Two young people meet.
     
    “They know they’re meant for each other, but they have obstacles to overcome.

    “They do, in fact, overcome those obstacles and the happy ending ensures, and they do so before the viewer loses interest.

    “Ladies and gentlemen, it is a bit like how I see the relationship between Canada and India.

    “We have had a very promising start.

    “But, we have to work hard to overcome the obstacles, and we have to work quickly and in a determined matter if we are to get to the happy ending that we both want.

    “It won’t be easy, but it can be done, so let’s get it done, let’s get it done quickly and it will be worth it.

    “Thank you again to the World Economic Forum for this invitation, and ladies and gentlemen for your patience and your attention.”


    Comments courtesy The Prime Minister's Office - Communications

  • 28 Oct 2012 7:38 AM | Leann Hackman-Carty (Administrator)

    Mr. Arendt is the country's most sought-after speaker on the topic of creative development design as a conservation tool. He has presented slides lectures in 47 states and five Canadian provinces.

     

    In recent years he has been featured as a key speaker at national conferences sponsored by the American Planning Association, the Urban Land Institute, the American Farmland Trust, the American Society of Landscape Architects, the National Association of Home Builders, the Land Trust Alliance and the US EPA. His work has been featured in leading periodicals including the New York Times, the Christian Science Monitor, the Wall Street Journal, Landscape Architect, Urban Land, the Amicus Journal, the Smithsonian and the New Yorker.

    For more information contact gbuchanan@athabascacounty.com

  • 02 Oct 2012 10:16 AM | Leann Hackman-Carty (Administrator)

    Beginning this Thursday in Calgary, Honourable Doug Horner, Treasury Board and Finance Minister, along with Minister of Finance Kyle Fawcett, will be hosting public consultations for Budget 2013.  

     

    If you are interested in participating, please RSVP to tbf.minister@gov.ab.ca and indicate which consultation listed below that you plan to attend.

     

    Calgary

    Thursday, October 4
    6 p.m. – 9 p.m.

    University of Calgary, Downtown Campus
    Event Centre 906 - 8th Avenue SW
    Calgary, AB

    Drumheller

    Tuesday, October 9
    9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Badlands Community Facility 
    80 Veterans Way
    Drumheller, AB
    (Near Drumheller Memorial Arena)

    Lethbridge

    Tuesday, October 9
    1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

    Lethbridge Lodge Hotel and Conference Centre
    Cedar Ballroom
    320 Scenic Drive
    Lethbridge, AB

    Medicine Hat

    Tuesday, October 9
    7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

    Medicine Hat Stampede and Exhibition Grounds
    Grandstand Banquet Room
    2055 - 21st Avenue SE
    Medicine Hat, AB

    Bonnyville

    Wednesday, October 10
    9 a.m. – 11 a.m.

    Bonnyville & District Centennial Centre
    Fieldhouse
    4313 - 50th Avenue
    Bonnyville, AB

    Red Deer

    Thursday, October 11
    3 p.m. – 5 p.m.

    Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites
    Promenade A
    37471 Highway 2 South
    Gasoline Alley
    Red Deer County, AB

    Grande Prairie

    Friday, October 12
    9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Holiday Inn Suites Grande Prairie
    Conference Centre, Salon A

    9816 - 107th Street
    Grande Prairie, AB

    Fort McMurray

    Friday, October 12
    2 p.m. – 4 p.m.

    The Stonebridge Fort McMurray Hotel
    Athabasca Room
    9713 Hardin Street
    Fort McMurray, AB

    Edmonton

    Saturday, October 13
    9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

    Chateau Louis Hotel and Conference Centre
    Grand Ballroom/Solarium
    11727 Kingsway NW
    Edmonton, AB

     

  • 24 Sep 2012 7:21 AM | Leann Hackman-Carty (Administrator)

    Sept. 24, 2012 – Edmonton – Seekers Media has added some spice to the special sauce in its business model by welcoming seasoned editor Lisa Monforton to its team.

    This addition further enhances Seekers’ ability to deliver compelling and authentic content to snow and festival seeking audiences.

    Monforton, former Edmonton Journal and Calgary Herald travel editor, brings with her more than 20 years of experience with marrying words and pictures, bolstering Seekers Media’s strength as the best source of timely snow, travel and entertainment information.

    Monforton’s role as SnowSeekers & FestivalSeekers editor will also include head coach for the growing team of correspondents.

    “Welcoming Lisa to our team is a stellar development in Seekers Media’s continued evolution,” said Jim Barr, CEO Seekers Media.  “We welcome her to not only manage content within the two websites and our mobile offerings but to draw upon her vast travel expertise to help mentor our correspondents on how they can strengthen their story-telling abilities.” 

    Seekers Media launched its correspondents network in January 2012 and is expanding this winter.

    The award-winning journalist and SAIT PR & Communications instructor joins the team to help ensure Seekers Media rewards audiences with authentic, first-person content.

    “Seekers Media is a multi-faceted content provider that I am excited and proud to work with,” said Monforton.  “No one else is providing adventure seekers with this type of information in such a user-friendly format.

    “I’m very much looking forward to working with Jim and the team as we expand the company’s portfolio and provide valuable and timely content to our audiences.”

    Heading into its fourth winter season, SnowSeekers is a leading source of information for planning winter getaways in the Pacific Northwest. With a suite of tools spanning mobile, online and social media channels, SnowSeekers empowers winter enthusiasts to plan the best experiences possible. Sharing through our smartphone app and social media tools help people get the most out of their time at a destination.

    For more information please visit www.snowseekers.ca

    Contact:           Jim Barr                                                           Lisa Monforton

                            CEO, Seekers Media                                         Editor & Correspondents Mentor

                            780.983.9913  jim@seekers-media.com             403.870.7724  lisa@seekers-media.com

  • 30 Jun 2012 10:25 AM | Leann Hackman-Carty (Administrator)
    New report released by the Government of Alberta. To download click here.
  • 07 Jun 2012 2:19 PM | Leann Hackman-Carty (Administrator)

    June 7, 2012- Edmonton – Seekers Media, the producers of SnowSeekers and FestivalSeekers, is pleased to announce a new partnership with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) around the furthering of its smartphone app interests.  “Seekers Media is thrilled to welcome John Devitt to our team.  Devitt, past Executive Director of the Revelstoke Chamber of Commerce and Revelstoke Tourism, will be working to uncover the value of augmented reality and how it can assist the tourism industry to not only see more butts in their seats but also increase the net promoter score of a destination,” explains Seekers Media CEO & President Jim Barr.   Augmented reality is not new, but in the past few months has seen a surging amount of interest. “Devitt’s mission is to uncover just what this technology can do if we were to bring it into our line of SnowSeekers apps,” says Barr.

    Google is launching their new Google glasses this fall and when you wear them, it will tell you the weather by looking outside, or connect you with friends virtually.  For a taste of the technology we suggest you have a look at this Google video, http://youtu.be/9c6W4CCU9M4

    Seekers Media has been focused on producing quality smartphone apps since June of 2009 – launching its initial SnowSeekers Go-Guide that same fall.   Since then its mobile developments have been a two year finalist within the Digital Alberta awards and most recently its SnowSeekers app was written up in a  Los Angeles Times story on how technology was helping to improve skier experience.  Seekers Media now takes on for hire app production working with communities including Vulcan, AB and The City of Cranbrook to produce their own apps utilizing Seekers smartphone software and production experience.

    “With now over 200,000 ‘seekers’ connected to us, it is exciting to see what additional value we can bring to them incorporating additional technology into our offerings,” explains Barr.  “Morgan Stanley is predicting that by early 2014 there will be more of us accessing the internet via mobile devises than by traditional desktop.  With a fact like that only a year and a half away, it’s critical for us at Seekers Media to keep our pulse on how to maximize the potentials of these devices.”

    Over the next few months Seekers Media will be reaching out to industry connections to gather their feedback on the technology and how it might work with them to bring their destination additional value.

    Seekers Media Inc

    Seekers Media has been recognized as one of Canada’s most innovative new media companies. By producing first person video/editorial/social content and distributing it through innovative means Seekers Media puts butts in seatsundefinedchair lifts, tourism destinations, and Western Canada’s top festival attractions.  The company is the curator of www.SnowSeekers.ca and www.FestivalSeekers.com, both of which have their own content production teams fueling online e-newsmagazines, thriving social media presences and digital guidebooks (smartphone apps for iPhone, BlackBerry, and Android).

    For additional details please contact:

    Jim Barr

    President; Seekers Media Inc

    780.983.9913 jim@seekers-media.com

  • 01 May 2012 9:28 AM | Leann Hackman-Carty (Administrator)

    In the 1950s, Canada was at a crossroads. The economy and the prosperity of Canadians were becoming severely constrained by a lack of access to cheap transportation to trade our goods to the world.

     

    A solution – though hotly debated – was at hand: Harness the great St. Lawrence River and give Eastern Canada and North America’s heartland a conduit to hungry markets in Europe. Against loud opposition, the St. Lawrence Seaway was born.

     

    That was 1959.

     

    Since then, according to reports, 260,000 vessels have travelled up and down the channel, moving 2.3 billion tonnes of goods totaling $350 billion. The seaway supports 75,000 jobs in Canada and another 150,000 in the U.S. Commerce on the system generates $4.3 billion in personal income per year.

     

    Fast forward to 2011. Fellow Canadians, we are at a crossroads again.

     

    Our nation’s most valuable resource is oil. The energy industry has become our largest industry.

     

    That industry is in very real danger of being constrained by one major structural weakness – our most important product has only one buyer. Nearly 100 per cent of the oil Canada exports is destined for the U.S.

    Throughout history, our proximity to the world’s largest energy consumer has given us a unique advantage – one all our competitors would love to have. We export about two million barrels per day to the U.S., making us America’s biggest supplier. The U.S. is, and will remain, Canada’s most important market and closest trading partner. 

     

    But Canada’s energy relationship with the U.S. can more accurately be described as dependent, not interdependent.  The U.S. has many suppliers of oil. We have only one buyer for ours. That is not a comfortable place to be.

     

    What’s even more concerning is that U.S. demand for oil is declining. That imbalance has forced Canadian oil producers to sell their product at a huge discount.

     

    And that imbalance threatens to get worse.

     

    That means fewer dollars in taxes oil companies pay governments. That means fewer royalties. That means less funding for social programs we’ve come to rely on. One energy expert has calculated that our landlocked oil is costing our governments $10 million in lost taxes and royalties every single day.

     

    It also means fewer jobs.

     

    Make no mistake – a declining energy sector will affect each and every Canadian. But, as was the case in the 1950s, there is a solution to protect our most valuable resource and our largest industry.

     

    Northern Gateway is a $5.5 billion pipeline and marine terminal that would connect Canada to the most voracious energy markets in the world: Asia. It is a smart, strategic, and sustainable way for Canada to safeguard its economy and maintain the standard of living we cherish.

     

    We intend to build a pipeline and marine terminal that is among the safest and most sustainable anywhere. Other nations have done so, and we can, too.

     

    But not after intense regulatory scrutiny – an assessment regime that is the strictest and most robust on the planet. We’ve committed to full participation in the regulatory process we’re currently in. It’s a tough but healthy exercise and one all Canadians should be proud of.

     

    Our critics would love to see our project rejected, our vast oil supply remain landlocked and our energy sector eventually wither and die. But the appetite for energy in Asia will not be denied, and other nations will step up to fill the void if we don’t.

     

    And who would they be? Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Nigeria, Iraq and Iran are the likeliest suppliers.

     

    Do those nations have the environmental and labour standards we do? Do their corporations operate as ethically as ours? Will energy-sector wealth in those nations support social programs and charities, train employees, and contribute to culture and education to the extent that ours does?

     

    Ask yourselves, would the world be worse, or indeed, better off if Canada were called upon to bring Canadian oil to markets around the planet?

     

    In the 1950s, leaders with courage and foresight forged ahead against waves of criticism and fear mongering to build the St. Lawrence Seaway. It’s now considered a technological marvel and a milestone in our history.

     

    Just as the St. Lawrence Seaway was a nation-building project in the 1950s, so too is Northern Gateway today.

     

    The crossroads lie right before us … which route we take is Canada’s choice to make.

     

    For more details on the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project, visit www.northerngateway.ca.

 

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